Not a Big Fan of Delayed Gratification? Take This: Design of Experiments (DOE)

by admin

Not a Big Fan of Delayed Gratification? Take This: Design of Experiments (DOE)

by admin

by admin

Let’s face it; delayed gratification is almost a thing of the past. Many of us receive our paychecks through direct deposit, order groceries online and have them delivered to the door, and access our favorite shows with a click of a button. Why wait when almost everything is available on demand?

So, if mining historical or observation data makes you feel like you’re waiting on pins and needles, know that there’s a better way to learn and draw conclusions from experiments. Design of Experiments is the key to learning proactively and doing so more effectively.

Design of Experiments: Drawing Conclusions Faster, More Efficiently

So, what is DOE? Simply put, it’s a method for determining the cause and effect between factors in a process and the output of said process. This systematic approach takes conclusions drawn from the understanding of the cause and effect and applies them to the design for better output. It can also be used to design improved products and processes. As processes are improved, the amount of time and money spent on production and development decreases.

While other experimentation methods are painstakingly slow (e.g., the one factor at a time method) or require numerous failures to draw real conclusions (e.g.,trial and error), DOE expedites the process as you can work with multiple variables simultaneously and make decisions at each stage. In other words, if you like getting more things done, faster, DOE is probably for you.  Why wait? Register for NWCPE’s Intro to Design of Experiments (SS505) today.

Practitioners analyze the following three factors during DOE to determine how these variations may affect output and ways to manage said variations for optimal output:

  • Uncontrollable input factors or factors that cannot be changed or controlled by the practitioner.
  • Controllable input factors or factors that can be changed during the process.
  • Responses or how you establish the desired output has been achieved.

As you purposely and systematically vary factors to study, you’ll isolate their potential effect on selected process outcomes. It’s not unusual to hear practitioners say, “I’ve been during this for 25 years claims but learned more about my process and what makes it work in the last two days of running a designed experiment that I learned in my first twenty-five years. “ It all comes down to the fact that you not only learn faster with DOE, but also learn better. As you discover the context and condition under the relationship between cause and effect is true, you avoid the trap of assuming what we or a whole industry may assume is a universal truth. The result? You become a regular myth buster.

Already got your feet wet in DOE and ready to dive in further? Sign up NWCPE’s Intermediate Design of Experiments (SS507) to get started!

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